Assignment for December 15

December 8, 2010

PROJECT:

Paper – Written results of research project:
at least three thousand (3,000) words of polished prose [at least five thousand (5,000) words of polished prose if enrolled for four hours credit], with citations and bibliography in an appropriate style, typed and double-spaced with an original and fitting title.

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Assignment for December 1/8

November 17, 2010

PROJECT:

Presentation – Oral synopsis of research project:
eight to ten (8-10) minutes of extemporaneous comments summarizing your findings, supported by a one-page handout bearing your name and project title.

Assignment for November 24

November 17, 2010

NO CLASS MEETING:

Fall Break

 

Assignment for November 17

November 10, 2010

NO CLASS MEETING:

Focus on your research project.

PROJECT:

Outline – Tentative organization of research paper:
at least one (1) full page specifying main points and subpoints, typed and double-spaced with an original and fitting title.

Assignment for November 10

November 3, 2010

READINGS:

Read the following selections in Environmental Justice and Environmentalism; come prepared to present each article:

Peterson and others, “Moving Toward Sustainability: Integrating Social Practice and Material Process”

De Chiro, “Indigenous Peoples and Biocolonialism: Defining the ‘Science of Environmental Justice’ in the Century of the Gene”

Pezzullo and Sandler, “Conclusion: Working Together and Working Apart”

Assignment for November 3

October 27, 2010

READINGS:

Preview Environmental Justice and Environmentalism: The Social Justice Challenge to the Environmental Movement; come prepared to introduce the text:

skim cover, front matter, back matter

read acknowledgments, appendices

Read the following selections in Environmental Justice and Environmentalism; come prepared to present each article:

Pezzullo and Sandler, “Introduction: Revisiting the Environmental Justice Challenge to Environmentalism”

DeLuca, “A Wilderness Environmentalism Manifesto: Contesting the Infinite Self-Absorption of Humans”

Wenz, “Does Environmentalism Promote Injustice for the Poor?”

PROJECT:

Bibliography – Penultimate list of research sources:
at least ten (10) relevant books, articles, and websites you have studied, cited in an appropriate bibliographic style, typed and double-spaced with an original and fitting title.

Assignment for October 27

October 20, 2010

READINGS:

Read the following selections in The Ecocriticism Reader; come prepared to present each article:

Deitering, “The Postnatural Novel: Toxic Consciousness in Fiction of the 1980s”

Love, “Revaluing Nature: Toward an Ecological Criticism”

Silko, “Landscape, History, and the Pueblo Imagination”

Slovic, “Nature Writing and Environmental Psychology: The Interiority of Outdoor Experience”

Assignment for October 20

October 13, 2010

READINGS:

Preview The Ecocriticism Reader: Landmarks in Literary Ecology; come prepared to introduce the text:

skim cover, front matter, back matter

read preface, acknowledgments

Read the following selections in The Ecocriticism Reader; come prepared to present each article:

Glotfelty, “Introduction: Literary Studies in an Age of Environmental Crisis”

Manes, “Nature and Silence”

Evernden, “Beyond Ecology: Self, Place, and the Pathetic Fallacy”

Mazel, “American Literary Environmentalism as Domestic Orientalism”

PROJECT:

Proposal – Formal description of research topic:
at least three hundred (300) words detailing the focus, methodology, and significance of your project, accompanied by a working bibliography of relevant sources you have accessed, typed and double-spaced with an original and fitting title.

Assignment for October 13

October 6, 2010

NO CLASS MEETING:

Focus on your research project.

Assignment for October 6

September 29, 2010

READINGS:

Read the following selections in Out of the Woods; come prepared to turn in a written outline for each article and to discuss key passages:

Stilgoe, “Landschaft and Linearity: Two Archetypes of Landscape”

Smilor, “Personal Boundaries in the Urban Environment: The Legal Attack on Noise, 1865-1930″

Pisani, “Irrigation, Water Rights, and the Betrayal of Indian Allotment”

Dunlap, “Australian Nature, European Culture: Anglo Settlers in Australia”

RESEARCH:

Continue exploring potential topics for your project; consult the Resources page for additional leads.

Assignment for September 29

September 22, 2010

READINGS:

Preview Out of the Woods: Essays in Environmental History; come prepared to introduce the text:

skim cover, front matter, back matter

read acknowledgments, introduction, section headnotes

Read the following selections in Out of the Woods; come prepared to outline each article and to discuss key passages:

Worster, “The Ecology of Order and Chaos”

Merchant, “The Theoretical Structure of Ecological Revolutions”

Cronon, “The Trouble with Wilderness: Or, Getting Back to the Wrong Nature”

SPECIAL BONUS READING (NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE):

In preparation for our guest speaker, read the following article:

Wood, “Introduction: Eco-historicism” (HANDOUT)

RESEARCH:

Continue exploring potential topics for your project; consult the Resources page for additional leads.

Assignment for September 22

September 15, 2010

READINGS:

Read the following selections in The Philosophy of Ecology and come prepared to summarize and to critique each selection.

Keller and Golley, “Rationalism and Empiricism”

Popper, “The Bucket and the Searchlight: Two Theories of Knowledge”

Keller and Golley, “Reductionism and Holism”

Levins and Lewontin, “Dialectics and Reductionism in Ecology”

Keller and Golley, “Ecology and Evolution”

Loehle and Pechmann, “Evolution: The Missing Ingredient in Systems Ecology”

RESEARCH:

Continue exploring potential topics for your project; consult the Resources page for additional leads.

Assignment for September 15

September 8, 2010

READINGS:

Preview The Philosophy of Ecology: From Science to Synthesis
(skim cover, front matter, back matter; read preface, acknowledgments, afterword);
come prepared to discuss your initial impressions of the book.

Read selections on pages 1-19, 21-33, 71-80, 101-110, and 119-123;
come prepared to summarize (outline/synopsis)
and to critique (insights/surprises/questions) each selection.

RESEARCH:

Review the table of contents for each of our five textbooks;
identify at least three selections that interest you,
that reflect the kind of topic you might pursue for your project.

Assignment for September 8

September 1, 2010

Read articles by Buell, Jackson,
White (The Ecocriticism Reader),
Jamieson (Environmental Justice and Environmentalism);
come prepared to summarize (outline/synopsis)
and to critique (insights/surprises/questions) each one.

Assignment for September 1

August 25, 2010

Preview Ecology and the Environment: Perspectives from the Humanities
(skim cover, front matter, back matter; read foreword, preface);
come prepared to discuss your initial impressions of the book.

Read articles by Swearer, Tucker, Zimmerman, and Taylor;
come prepared to summarize (outline/synopsis)
and to critique (insights/surprises/questions) each one.

Welcome to the course!

August 20, 2010

Our first class meeting is Wednesday, August 25, 6:00-8:30 p.m. at 1032 Foreign Languages Building (south side of the first floor).

Please enter your email address at the bottom of the page to receive course assignments and other important information.

See you in class!